“The King Of Horror”

Vincent Leonard Price, Jr. – known as “The King of Horror”  was born May 27, 1911 in St. Louis, MO.

"King Of Horror"

Vincent Price in Laura trailer Created: 31 December 1943 – Public Domain

His performing career spanned across every imaginable genre.  He was at home of stage, screen, recording studio and radio.  Vincent price has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.  One is for television and one for film.  He has a star on the St. Louis Walk of Fame, too.

Plenty of Stars and Credits for Performance, but there was much more to The King of Horror.

Vincent was an art collector.  He purchased his first Rembrandt when he was twelve.  He saved his allowance for a year to own that first piece.  It was the beginning of a life long interest in art.  He opened a gallery in Beverly Hills, California in the 1940’s.  He became a well respected collector, and helped establish the Vincent Price Art Museum at East Los Angeles College in Monterey Park, California.  The first teaching art collection owned by a community college in the United States.

Gourmet Cook

Vincent Price was recognized as a gourmet cook.  He hosted “Cooking Pricewise” – a cooking television program.  Once he demonstrated how to poach fish in a dish washer on late night TV with Johnny Carson.  He also authored several cookbooks, including, “Come Into the Kitchen” and “A Treasury of Great Recipes.”

Limitless List of Work

We may remember him best as “The King of Horror.” but his body of work includes every kind of quality performance.  He gave us comedy, bible stories, and even gave his voice to Michael Jackson’s “Thriller.”

I remember him from “The Monster Mash.”

One Classy Gentleman.

A man who limits his interests limits his life.’ – Vincent Price.

 

Ice in the Loop! (dragon? get camera)

Ice carving at Fitz'sTuesday Morning, and it’s Frigid.  I’m always in the Delmar Loop Area because we have Story Time at Subterranean Books.  I tend to arrive in the area early and enjoy a cup before walking down the street.  These guys caught my eye and i simply had to share.  Ice in the Loop!

That's Right! An Ice Dragon!That’s Right!  No matter how cold it was, I was determined to get a photo of this Dragon.

Ice carving Demonstration at Ftiz'sIce Visions gave a performance outside Fitz’s and these guys were left over, standing on top of the brick border that surrounds Fitz’s delivery area.  This event was part of the annual Ice Carnival.

Ice in the Loop!It had to be a splendid celebration this year, because it was Cold.  The past couple years, i think there was plenty of fun to be had, and it was crazy comfortable, I doubt people even had to wear coats, it was so warm.  This year, however – our cold days landed on the preferred date, so people could shiver and enjoy.

Fitz’s makes fabulous root beer.  Their motto is, “If it wasn’t better, we wouldn’t make it.”  Its fun to walk by and listen to families laugh together.  There’s always a lot to enjoy, and discover in The Loop neighborhood.

Ice?  Not Often..

Sidewalk Star

William Inge is one of our Sidewalk Stars.

We have a “Walk of Fame” on Delmar Blvd. in University City.  I think the number of stars is still growing.  140 seems to be the current agreed upon number.

The star that always captures my attention sits at 6624 Delmar.  This star is dedicated to William Inge.  (I wonder if he would prefer to be called “Mr. Inge?”)  William Inge must have been a personal favorite of my drama teacher because we studied his plays in depth and I won awards and scholarships doing scenes from “Come Back, Little Sheba” and “Bus Stop.”  It’s safe to say much of my higher education and career opportunities came from the work of Mr. William Inge.  So, of course, this star has meaning for me.

Sidewalk Star William IngeWilliam Inge was born in Independence, Kansas in 1913.  When he was old enough he joined a local Boy Scout Troop and together they were invited to great community events.  Fortunately for me, some of these events were theatrical.  “Memorial Hall” had a theater and the scouts were invited to sit in the balcony and watch the performances.  (It’s great to see Memorial Hall continues to serve the community.)

William Inge must have been a gifted student.  After graduating from University of Kansas, he was offered opportunities to continue his education.  Partway through his master’s program he left school to find himself.  He worked on a highway crew for a while and then began his own path.  He was a radio announcer, a high school teacher, went off to finish his Master’s Degree and in 1938 moved to Columbia, Missouri to teach at Stephens College.

In 1943 he moved to St. Louis, MO and became a drama and music critic at the St. Louis Star-Times.  I suppose that’s where he met and became friends with Tennessee Williams.  That friendship inspired Mr. Inge to begin working on his first play, “Farther Off From Heaven” which was produced in Dallas in 1947.   Inge taught at Washington University (1946 – 1949)  and went on to create his stellar body of work.

photo permission given (and gifted) by Lily Morgan, Director of Library Services, Independence Community College

photo permission given (and gifted) by Lily Morgan, Director of Library Services, Independence Community College

He turned a short story into “Come Back Little Sheba” and earned the title “Most Promising Playwright of the 1950’s Season.”  In 1953, his work “Picnic” opened in New York City and won several awards, including a Pulitzer Prize.

His original Screenplay, “Splendor in the Grass,” earned William Inge an Oscar in 1961.

He gave us and era of stories about life in small mid-western towns.

Yes, I’d say he deserves a Star . . and a lot of Thank You’s.

In learning more about Mr. Inge, I met some excellent people.

Speaking of “THANK YOU” – I am grateful for help from Patrick O’Leary at The Inge Center and Lily Morgan, Director of Library Services at Independence Community College, for their help, encouragement and permission to use the handsome photo of William Inge.

Independence Community College LibraryIndependence Community College Library