Overwhelm @ Museum of Transportation

The Museum of Transportation houses a world class collection of transportation vehicles.

Museum of TransportationSomething to catch the eye in every corner.  First, there’s amazement, Then a lot of respect.

We will take a beginning tour today.  I’ll return to add stories and photos of parts of the massive collection.

The Museum of Transportation is a County Park

The project began in the 1940’s. The Transport Museum Association, Museum of Transportation and St. Louis County Parks collaboration.  The museum began using track from 1930 Missouri Pacific railroad.

Excellent Place for Children

Museum of TransportationActivities for most age groups.  There’s a train that circles the property.  Unlimited Rides with admission wrist band.  There is also a craft station called “Creation Station.”  This is popular with guardians and children.  Registration required because the room becomes packed with happy youngsters.

Excellent Place for Adult “Children”

Automobile show room with displays beginning with wagons and continues through the 20th Century.

museum of transportation milk wagonPevely Dairy Wagon.  Looks like fun to me.

 Museum of Transportation - Dream CarBobby Darin “Dream Car”

Called “Outrageous Vision of the Future.”

Trains?  We got ’em!

Transportation - Union PacificUnion Pacific Railroad #900081

Built in 1966 – Biggest, heaviest rotary snowplow.

kinda scary at first glance

Museum of TransportationThis looks like a great story.

Plenty of opportunity to learn.

A few other things to share today.

TowboatTowboat “H.T. Pott”

First Missouri River Towboat with welded steel hull.

Kids enjoy climbing this big fella.

what a craftDouglas Aircraft C-47A Transport

A Dandy!

I’ll simply have to return

too overwhelmed.  need to consider.  will pause for now to think

sure like bencheson this beautiful bench.

2933 Barrett Station Road – St. Louis, MO 63122

If you find me sitting on this bench, let’s do hot chocolate.  I’ll buy.

love & love,

-g-

Conversations with Sleeping Heroes

Days of ceremony happen on occasion.  Flags fly high. Marching bands and parades fill the avenues.   Uniformed dignitaries  stroll to the stage to deliver a speech.  Most of the hours, days and years are quiet.  Good times to hold conversations with sleeping heroes.

Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery Ten acres were set aside by soldiers in 1826 for burial ground.  Elizabeth Ann Lash, infant daughter of an officer is the first recorded burial.

Jefferson Barracks National CemeteryIn March 1863, the U.S. Army established the Jefferson Barracks Post Cemetery.  The cemetery covers 310 acres.  The area sits on bluffs overlooking the Mississippi River.

Jefferson Barracks National CemeteryIn 1866, the Secretary of War designated the post cemetery as a national cemetery.  The Civil War brought remains of many fallen to rest.  In 1922 WW I Veterans required a medical center.  WW II required land from the military post for cemetery space.   Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery became a central location for group interments.  Sleeping Heroes, every kind, color and their limitless stories are here.

Jefferson Barracks National CemeteryEvery Row, from every angle – always straight.

chapel 7 - Jefferson Barracks cemetery spaces for gatherings

Surrounded - Protected - LovedThere are several shelters placed around the cemetery called “committal shelters.”  There are heroes, along with their spouses, from many different belief systems.  I like the regard for feelings, wishes, rights, or traditions of others I find here.  Many of these heroes did not know this respect and inclusiveness in their waking life.

Visiting Columbaria at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery

Jefferson Barracks National CemeteryI passed the word “Columbarium” a few times.  I admit I did not know understand until reaching a hill top.  It was such a lovely place, I decided to stroll around.

Columbarium - Jefferson Barracks National CemeteryThis part of the cemetery has newer dates.  There are nice places to rest and reflect.

Columbarium - jefferson Barracks National CemeteryIt feels good to listen to the breeze all around, and feel a sense of hope.

sleeping heroesQuiet and Comfort is built right in.  It’s as if we are welcome to sit a while.

Conversations with Sleeping Heroes

(some else has come to spend time)

conversations with sleeping heroes

Monuments honor different parts of the story.  There is a monument to Civil war dead, Confederate dead,  WW II, Korean War, Vietnam and the Gulf War..

There are memorials for War Unknowns.

There is a red granite boulder commemorating officers and soldiers who died at Fort Bellefontaine.

One of the older monuments is dedicated to 175 soldiers of the 56th U.S. Colored Infantry.

There is a monument by artist John K. Daniels to honor the 164 Minnesotan officers and soldiers buried at this national cemetery.

There are eight recipients of the Medal of Honor and three Revolutionary War veterans.

U.S. Air Force Lieutenant Michael Blassie was shot down over South Vietnam.  His remains were sent to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery.  After a DNA test, his parents asked to bring him home to Jefferson Barracks.

The stories seem to continue forever.

stories to last forever

Old Stone Church – Faith Des Peres

There’s a little rock church, once called “The Old Meeting House” by early settlers, was the original home of Faith Des Peres, a Presbyterian Church in Des Peres, Missouri.  Elijah P. Lovejoy was one of the early ministers here.  Rev. Dr. Anne Epling is their minister today.  I got to meet her leaving the Original Stone Faith Des Peres.  The congregation continues to hold services right here a couple of times a year – Memorial Day Sunday happened to be one of those days.  I met three people packing up to leave, all of them kind and delightful.  I’m tempted to visit their current, modern facility . . but, that’s another story.

Original stone church, built 1833In 1833, three families donated one acre each for the meeting house which was to include a cemetery.  Many of the grave markers for families that go back many generations and still live in the area.

Faith Des Peres CemeteryIt’s interesting to know the people donating this land were slave owners, because there are stories about “The Old Stone Meeting House” was a stop on the Underground Railroad.

Faith Des Peres CemeteryThere is a sign on property sharing part of the story.  In 1983 one small marker was placed to memorialize those who worked for others and were never free.

slave burial marker, Old Stone Meeting House Cemeteryone stone for many lives

Faith Des PeresThe facility has been restored.  It hasn’t been an easy road over the years.  It wasn’t always top priority to maintain an old stone structure, but the building lasted long enough for the 1970’s enthusiasm of a new minister, Rev. Robert W. Tabscott.  Rev. Tabscott had a passion for historical preservation, diversity and a better quality of life.  He inspired many in the congregation to save the Original Old Stone Meeting House, and it seems that project, along with many others has remained part of the foundation of their church community.

air conditioning, electric lights, up to code and ready for the future.Air conditioning, electric lights, up to code and ready for the future., Faith Des Peres has offered all of us a hearty welcome and invitation to attend services, at the little stone church, or at their modern facility.  I have the feeling it’s a fine place to be.

The Original Stone Meeting House/Faith Des Peres Church is found @ 2250 North Geyer Road, 63131 – (Memorial Day Weekend, Labor Day Weekend, 1st Sundays of July and August – perhaps other fun events, like Easter Egg Hunts)

and

11155 Clayton Road 63131 (on “Normal Sundays”)

10:30 AM (but, you might want to check – 314-432-8029)

I suspect the music will be great.

The Water Tower

The Water Tower on Grand Avenue is so well know, businesses are named after it, directions are given using the Water Tower as a reference, it is on the National Historic Registry and, even though it sits in a neighborhood called “College Hill,”  most people refer to it as “The Water Tower District.”

Water Tower on North Grand Ave, St. Louis, MO

 My initial visits to the Water Tower District was to meet and help a remarkable gentleman, Otis Woodard.  He served the community, the poorest of the poor, the people who had been cast out, thrown away by society.  Otis had a cupboard open to anyone, on the side of his home and he had a sound system set up so he could hear anyone outside crying.  If he heard someone in need, or distress, day or night, he would go outside to help and comfort them.  He provided transportation for those with jobs, so they could get safely to work and home again and he found ways to help new, or expecting mothers, even offering lessons on cooking, raising and nurturing a family.

You can understand that Water Tower means way more than meets the eye.  It was the easy way to find Otis.   To me, that Water Tower speaks of Hope and a Future.

 Otis has since left us, but he leaves behind a legacy, showed us a way, provided us with “Peace Park.”  at anytime we can choose to follow his example.  (Here is a little more of Otis, just because.)

If you choose to listen to Otis, you might hear a little about how this area holds infinite treasures of the heart (did you notice the water tower in the background?).  I’ll continue to share a little about the Water Tower ItSelf.  I read some stories about how water pressure was a life changer in the 1800’s.  It’s something I did not consider, things like being able to get water to fight a fire, or be amazed when you could soak your entire body in a bathtub.

George Barnett, once considered the “Dean of St. Louis Architecture,” built the Water Tower in 1871.  It served to regulate water pressure until 1912.  For a while a light was placed on top of the tower to direct air craft.  Eventually the community decided it was important to restore the tower, it was put on the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.

Somehow this tower means more, in the hearts of humans, than first glance would tell us.

Were you going to ask?  It is 154 feet tall.  It is pretty, but maybe the beauty comes from . . . well, you can tell me.  Okay?

Higher Hopes symbolized by that Water Tower

Water Tower, intersection of Grand Avenue and 20th Street, College Hill neighborhood, St. Louis, Missouri

The Coronado a Good Save!

The Coronado, Imagined by Preston J. Bradshaw in 1923, re-imagined for the 21st Century by Amy and Amrit Gill.  What a Good Save!

Coronado Classy Welcome

I looked up the address listed as residence for William Inge (the playwright) and learned 3701 Lindell Blvd. was and is the Coronado.  I went to visit, just to see if I could get a photo of the past and wow, I was in for a surprise.

3701 Lindell, St. Louis, MO

Turns out this place officially opened in 1925 and the public loved it right away.  It was a gathering place for the elite and famous.  We didn’t have “paparazzi” like we do today, but I bet there were plenty of newspaper people there, looking for a scoop.

Every detail at the Coronado is elegant

People came for entertainment and to stay.  Coronado prices from the 1920’s were $2.50 for a room and shower, $3.50 for room with a bath and a double occupancy room started at $5.00.  I haven’t seen monthly prices.

beautiful Details all over the Coronado, St. Louis, MO

After a while the novelty wore off, the place started to fall into disrepair and went into foreclosure.  The location is perfect, though and St. Louis University purchased it in 1964.  It was turned into student dorms with a dining hall and a recreation room.  They cared for the facility until 1984, then decided to sell it to a Property Group and the building stayed empty for 15 years.

every detail invites people to enjoy special events at the Coronado

It is said the place simply fell apart and, by the time Restoration St. Louis, Inc. stepped in to keep it from complete ruin, part of the roof had collapsed, a wall had fallen in and rubble inside was chest deep.  It took at least $40 million dollars to reclaim this beautiful piece of history, but now it is one of the Premier Places to hold a special event in St. Louis.

Staying Cozy in a beautiful Setting

Not only that, the rooms have been completely refurbished and, when I was there, lines of young people about to attend St. Louis University, were crowding the rental office to tour the new apartments.  Campus is right across the street, these new places will be affordable, classy and safe digs for the future of our nation.

Ballroom and meeting Facility. Coronado, St. Louis, MO

How cool is that?

Great Save, The Coronado, St. Louis, MO

The Coronado  3701 Lindell Blvd.  St. Louis, MO  63108